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"To begin with, you need to write. This seems axiomatic because it is. The only way to amass a pile of words into a book is to shovel some every single day. No days off. You have to form this habit; without it you are screwed. I’m going to assume everyone who keeps reading already has this down. If you don’t — you won’t make it. My best advice on how to form this habit is twofold: Get comfortable staring at a blank screen and not writing. This is a skill. If you can not write and avoid filling that time with distractions, you’ll get to the point where you start writing. Open your manuscript and just be with it."

~ Note to self, and to @anotherbrilliantzinger

Hugh Howey, author of the famous Wool series, offers his advice to aspiring writers – a fine addition to our ongoing archive of writing advice.

For the ultimate resource, see the famous writers’ collected advice on writing. And for empirical evidence of this rain-or-shine approach to writing, see the daily routines of great authors

(via explore-blog)

24 July 2014 ·

"Much of Hamlet is about the precise kind of slippage the mourner experiences: the difference between being and seeming, the uncertainty about how the inner translates into the outer, the sense that one is expected to perform grief palatably. (If you don’t seem sad, people worry; but if you are grief-stricken, people flinch away from your pain.)"

~ Yet another reason to experience Hamlet.

Meghan O’Rourke on how Hamlet can helps us through grief and despair.

O’Rourke’s moving memoir of losing her mother is a must-read for anyone who has ever lost a loved one or ever will – which is just about all of us capable of love.

(via explore-blog)

23 July 2014 ·

Running  out of books to read? FREE FREE FREE downloads from Little Brown!
littlebrown:

Enjoy your summer with our free reading samplers! You can download a fiction AND a nonfiction sampler today and get samples of all of these LB titles, plus books from our friends at grandcentralpub and Twelve! We ❤️ free books! Download here. Running out of books to read? FREE FREE FREE downloads from Little Brown!

littlebrown:

Enjoy your summer with our free reading samplers! You can download a fiction AND a nonfiction sampler today and get samples of all of these LB titles, plus books from our friends at grandcentralpub and Twelve! We ❤️ free books! Download here.

23 July 2014 ·

What he said.
explore-blog:

For Raymond Chandler's birthday today, his collected wisdom on writing from a lifetime of letters What he said.

explore-blog:

For Raymond Chandler's birthday today, his collected wisdom on writing from a lifetime of letters

23 July 2014 ·

Life after the terminal degree

As I was blathering on about the latest book I read, a doctoral student colleague of mine (still dissertating) remarked, “You mean you’re reading for fun?!”

A smile broke across my face. “Why, yes I am. A lot.”

"How much ‘a lot’?"

"Oh, probably six books since I graduated in May …" I let my voice trail off, lest I interrupt her further. She had been taking notes when I arrived for our Sunday morning study time. I had promised to follow through with our study dates, because "Friends don’t let friends stay ABD."*

While she continued, I opened Pinterest on my iPad. A review of my “Books I’d Recommend” board revealed the luscious truth: in the 11 weeks since commencement, I had read 9 books. Some audio books had been my faithful companions as I made the 7-hour round trip to my mother’s. Still others had been secret nighttime reads — downloaded to Overdrive from my local library and read on my iPad. Two had been rich, hardbound autographed editions, gifts from my bookstore employee son.

Once a paper edition purist, I realized I had become a reading omnivore. Any format, any time. While current technology allows me to satisfy my book addition 24/7, I continue to crave the tactile pleasure of opening a new book, caressing deckle edged pages, inhaling its new-book smell.

Ah, reading for pleasure! How I’ve missed you!

* all but dissertation, the point in the doctoral degree process where the only requirement left to earn the PhD is completion and defense of the dissertation.

Follow Lorie’s board Books I’d Recommend on Pinterest.

20 July 2014 ·

3,040 plays

Everybody Hurts

Patti Smith

I love, love, love these mashups! They make me wish I were still teaching high school and could use them to draw students in to the beauty of poetry.

literaryjukebox:

Pain—has an Element of Blank—

It cannot recollect

When it began—or if there were

A time when it was not—

It has no Future—but itself—

Its Infinite contain

Its Past—enlightened to perceive

New Periods&mndash;of Pain

Song: “Everybody Hurts” by Patti Smith

20 July 2014 ·

Loved her
vanityfair:

“[She’s] a broad, in the best sense of the word. She’s funny, fabulous, fearless, fragile…” 
Director Chiemi Karasawa on the late Elaine Stritch.
Photograph by Brigitte Lacombe. Loved her

vanityfair:

“[She’s] a broad, in the best sense of the word. She’s funny, fabulous, fearless, fragile…”

Director Chiemi Karasawa on the late Elaine Stritch.

Photograph by Brigitte Lacombe.

18 July 2014 ·

"She was the kind of hard-drinking, salty-talking dame that they don’t make anymore…"

~ Remembering Elaine Stritch, Who Kept Us Laughing for Seven Decades (via vanityfair)

(via vanityfair)

18 July 2014 ·

Honoring the late Mandela on his birthday
explore-blog:

The great Nelson Mandela would’ve been 96 today – celebrate with some timeless wisdom from his inauguration address and autobiography.  Honoring the late Mandela on his birthday

explore-blog:

The great Nelson Mandela would’ve been 96 today – celebrate with some timeless wisdom from his inauguration address and autobiography

18 July 2014 ·

GOOD to know!


udis-glutenfree:

Our picks for the 2014 #Top10 #GlutenFree Accommodating Colleges are in. Click on the link in our profile and see which #schools made the cut! GOOD to know!

udis-glutenfree:

Our picks for the 2014 #Top10 #GlutenFree Accommodating Colleges are in. Click on the link in our profile and see which #schools made the cut!

17 July 2014 ·

"Oh, YES!!

Ever finished a book? I mean, truly finished one? Cover to cover. Closed the spine with that slow awakening that comes with reentering consciousness?

You take a breath, deep from the bottom of your lungs and sit there. Book in both hands, your head staring down at the cover, back page or wall in front of you.

You’re grateful, thoughtful, pensive. You feel like a piece of you was just gained and lost. You’ve just experienced something deep, something intimate… Full from the experience, the connection, the richness that comes after digesting another soul.

[…]

It’s no surprise that readers are better people. Having experienced someone else’s life through abstract eyes, they’ve learned what it’s like to leave their bodies and see the world through other frames of reference. They have access to hundreds of souls, and the collected wisdom of all them.

"

~

Beautiful read on why readers are, “scientifically,” the best people to date

Perhaps Kafka’s timeless contention that books are "the axe for the frozen sea inside us" applies equally to the frozen sea between us. 

(via explore-blog)

17 July 2014 ·

How Writing Retreats Can Grow Your Career | Fiction School Podcast #35

bakerlawley:

http://ift.tt/PSzF6C

Sometimes there are just too many dishes in the sink to get that line of dialogue right. The TV is too loud to make that first sentence sing, you know? Real life. It gets in the way of Fictionland all too often. But what if you want to get away from real life and crank […]

The post How Writing Retreats Can Grow Your Career | Fiction School Podcast #35 appeared first on Fiction School.



from Fiction School http://bit.ly/1oAaLSM
via IFTTT

17 July 2014 ·

An awesome achievement in American literature!
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 
An awesome achievement in American literature!

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

(via npr)

17 July 2014 ·

You can use Ethyl Acetate to do biaryl coupling reactions, but you’d be out of your god damn mind to claim it’s a revolution in green chemistry. Like I did.

Ah, the 20/20 hindsight of academic research!

lolmythesis:

Chemistry (MChem), University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Exploring electron donors for the coupling of haloarnes to arenes”.

Contact if you want a look. 

17 July 2014 ·

It’s a great day to be gluten-free at Costco 😄

It’s a great day to be gluten-free at Costco 😄

11 July 2014 ·

About Me

Having completed my doctoral studies, I stand ready to see what's in store for this next phase of my life. I do know I must write more and about a wider range of subjects. So many things stir my passion: equality for all, lifelong learning, living right to live longer.

A troupe of wily characters also beckons me to tell their tales.

So here we go!